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Miso soup is a simple classic. In Japan, it has been eaten for thousands of years. Miso’s flavor is a perfect example of that savory fifth essential taste, umami, that your tongue can tell apart  from salty, sour, bitter, or sweet. The paste, which is usually made from fermented soybeans, also has a slight tangy, salty taste like soy sauce. For such a light dish, miso soup is a good source of protein and vitamins, and it is low-carb and low-fat. Even better, miso soup has been linked to reduced risk of cancer. What a superfood!

Traditionally, miso broth is served with very little accompaniment, as an appetizer or even as breakfast. If you prefer a heartier, more filling version that is just as healthy and easy to prepare, you can fill your soup with tofu and veggies. Either way, this light meal is so simple, you can make it right in your bowl.

Traditional Miso Soup
serves 1

  • 2 tsp miso paste, any variety
  • 2 oz tofu
  • ½ scallion
  1. Bring a small pot of water to a boil. You can also simply boil water in a tea kettle.
  2. Cut tofu into fine cubes.
  3. Slice the scallion into small pieces.
  4. Place tofu and scallions in a soup bowl. Cover with enough boiling water to fill the bowl three-quarters full.
  5. Stir in the miso with a spoon while the water is still hot, but not boiling. Overcooking the miso paste reduces its health benefits.

Enjoy!

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Hearty Miso Soup
serves 1

  • 2 tsp miso paste, any variety
  • 4 oz tofu
  • 1 scallion
  • handful of spinach*
  • handful of frozen peas or beans
  1. Bring a small pot of water to a boil. You can also simply boil water in a tea kettle.
  2. Cut tofu into fine cubes.
  3. Slice the scallion into small pieces.
  4. Place tofu, scallion, and peas or beans in a soup bowl.
  5. Tear or crumble the spinach into the bowl.
  6. Cover with enough boiling water to fill the bowl three-quarters full.
  7. Stir in the miso with a spoon while the water is still hot, but not boiling. Overcooking the miso paste reduces its health benefits.

Enjoy!

*Tip: Keep a bag of prewashed spinach in the freezer — the kind from the produce aisle, not the kind that’s sold cooked and frozen. Whenever you want to add a serving of veggies to a dish, add a handful or two of spinach. There’s no need to pre-thaw if you’re adding it to food while it cooks, and the spinach crumbles easily in your hand.